laboratory

Gingivalis associated with its virulence.

This affects important features of the bacterial cells themselves and how the disease fighting capability recognizes this pathogen. This could explain why smokers will end up being resistant to treatment for periodontitis and so are more susceptible to oral disease due to illness with P. Gingivalis. Finding an effective treatment for smokers contaminated with P. Gingivalis will end up being easier given that these adjustments in the bacterium’s ‘properties’ have been identified. University of Louisville researcher, Dr David Scott said: ‘It is definitely known that smokers are even more susceptible to periodontitis than are nonsmokers. Continue reading